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North Carolina's 2016-17 state budget responsibly limited the growth rate of state spending, wisely padded the state's Rainy Day Fund, cut taxes further and continued one of the most aggressive trends of teacher pay increases in the nation.
North Carolina's 2016-17 state budget responsibly limited the growth rate of state spending, wisely padded the state's Rainy Day Fund, cut taxes further and continued one of the most aggressive trends of teacher pay increases in the nation.
Civitas Action has released its annual Conservative Effectiveness Rankings of North Carolina state lawmakers for 2016.
The words "ambitious state budget" must test well in polls and focus groups
After Roy Cooper's campaign indicated he would have vetoed the bipartisan budget bill signed by Governor McCrory to raise teacher pay and cut taxes for the middle-class, The Pat McCrory Committee slammed Roy Cooper for putting partisan politics above teachers, families and students
Teachers across North Carolina applauded Governor McCrory for signing a new state budget that raises average teacher pay to over $50,000 plus benefits
In another encouraging sign for North Carolina's economy, Governor Pat McCrory announced today that for the third time this year, the State Budget Office has revised revenue figures upward above May projections by $95 million
State Senator Bill Cook (R-District 1) voted today in support of the final bipartisan state budget compromise with the House of Representatives and Governor Pat McCrory
As the General Assembly continues to work through the 2016-17 budget, part of the final package should build on the tax reforms first implemented in 2011
State lawmakers in Raleigh are about to release their budget plans for the 2016-17 fiscal year
"My problem," the notoriously reckless actor Errol Flynn was once reported to have quipped, "lies in reconciling my gross habits with my net income."
Last week, the House passed their proposed $22.225 billion state budget, and we in the Senate have already begun meeting and crafting our version of the budget
The full details of Governor Pat McCrory's proposed budget adjustments for the 2016-17 Fiscal Year have been released
If you believe the GOPe campaign rhetoric, they've got our state headed in a "conservative direction." *Wow. That sounds great. We must be cutting taxes and the size of government all over the doggone place. Right? (Um, right?)*
Finally. Now that the 2015 General Assembly has adjourned, there's a lot for conservatives to celebrate. This was a session built on the principles that started to turn the state around in 2011.
An interesting item suddenly appeared this week in the N.C. Senate farm bill. This item made its appearance a few short days after the new state budget was finally approved. Among other things, the new budget ended North Carolina's longtime, exceedingly generous 35 percent investment tax credit...
As a longtime observer of the North Carolina legislature, I have a pet peeve: lawmakers, lobbyists, and reporters alike focus too much attention on the General Fund of the state budget, those expenditures funded largely by state taxes on incomes and retail sales.
Those who watch state government have had plenty to talk about since the General Assembly passed the state's new $21.7 billion state budget. Since education is the single largest item in the state budget, here are three things you probably didn't hear about education spending.
On net, this year's final budget deal can be viewed positively by conservatives. Tipping the scales in favor of the spending plan include: a net tax cut of nearly $400 million over two years, allowing the renewable energy tax credit to expire, elimination of taxpayer support for the highly...
After nearly eight months of lengthy and heated discussion, Republican leaders in the North Carolina Senate and House have come to a consensus on a $21.7 billion state budget for the next two years. Since education comprises the single biggest item in the state budget, there is a lot of interest...
The FY 2015-16 North Carolina state budget has finally been finalized. Was it worth the wait? Rather than wading through 400 pages of text, you can read here about the ten most interesting and important aspects of the budget in this article.
Sixty-plus days past a July 1st deadline and North Carolina still has no state budget. One issue that many think is prolonging the current stalemate is what to do about teacher assistants (TAs). The best way to break the impasse is for the General Assembly to follow the state Senate's lead and...
Governor Pat McCrory signed today a $21.735 billion state budget that supports his agenda as proposed in his State of the State address and in his budget proposal submitted in March.
State taxpayers will pay $400 million less over the next two years if lawmakers pass a $21.735 billion state budget deal announced Monday by legislative leaders. The 2016-17 state budget also expands the sales tax base to include more repair and service work to help offset the tax rate reductions.
For those of us who have been fighting to eliminate solar and other renewable energy subsidies from the burden being born by North Carolina's taxpayers, the new state budget is very welcome. As of January 1, the 35 percent tax credit for renewables in general and solar in particular, by far the...
Republican legislative leaders finally unveiled their proposed biennial state budget. (Geez, it's about time, folks.) The budget is now subject to votes by each legislative chamber and action by Governor McCrory.
As Vidant Health continues to assess the potential impacts of an incomplete state budget, including the uncertainty of Medicaid reform, its Board of Directors approved the fiscal year 2016 operational plan today.
As budget negotiations for the long-overdue 2015 North Carolina state budget continue, the Civitas Institute would like to remind legislators and taxpayers about opportunities to save real money in the budget - which will enable negotiators to come to an agreement once and for all.
As budget negotiations for the long-overdue 2015 North Carolina state budget continue, the Civitas Institute would like to remind legislators and taxpayers about opportunities to save real money in the budget - which will enable negotiators to come to an agreement once and for all.
Unable to reach an agreement on a state General Fund budget, legislative leaders plan to extend their temporary budget continuing resolution until September 18...
Governor Pat McCrory announced today that he has reached an agreement with Senate and House leaders on the spending amount for a revised state budget. At a morning breakfast meeting with the Governor at the Executive Mansion, House and Senate leadership agreed upon a budget spending amount...
The General Assembly on Wednesday approved a measure allowing state government to continue spending money through the end of the month while budget writers from both chambers continue to hammer out a compromise.
The Senate is still in negotiations about their version of the budget. We know just a few things about what the Senate is working on from the sub-committee appropriations meetings and from comments members have made to the media. One of the senior budget writers, Senator Harry Brown (R-Onslow) told
An unusual coalition of 12 liberal Democrats and 11 conservative Republicans comprised the only formal opposition to the $22.1-billion General Fund budget passed around 1:15 a.m. May 22 by the state House of Representatives.
North Carolina state government would boost its savings reserves and set aside more money for infrastructure, while still increasing starting teachers' pay, providing additional tax relief for families, and limiting government spending growth.
Gov. Pat McCrory's proposal to establish a new state government department for information technology makes sense. But lawmakers should revisit a similar proposal for a department targeting veterans affairs. Those are two key findings from a new John Locke Foundation Spotlight report.
Amid the uncertainty of state budget negotiations, one fact still holds: North Carolina's corporate tax rates will continue to drop, and those cuts will improve the state's standing in an index from the Tax Foundation in Washington, D.C., ranking state business climates.
The bottom line is that the governor's budget would increase K-12 education spending by 2.8 percent, or $235 million more, than the 2014-15 N.C. state budget.
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