21 Results found for mitch kokai

[ Search Users ] [ Search Calendar Events ]

Title   Description   Keywords   Content   Exact
 

The head of the FBI has characterized Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as "extremely careless" in handling sensitive - even classified - information on her private email server when she led the U.S. State Department
Pulitzer Prize winner Gaul examines elite programs in recent book... It's no secret that the world of college football involves huge amounts of money.
As the next president of the United States sits down for the first time in the Oval Office, the top item on his to-do list might involve policies designed to boost a sluggish economy. Or perhaps she will survey the international landscape and focus on efforts to crush ISIS and contain Russian and...
Ever since the movie "Wall Street" hit the big screen in 1987, left-of-center pundits and partisans have tried to tie conservatives and Republicans to that movie's villain, Gordon Gekko. His motto was "Greed is good." Twenty-eight years later, Ed Morrissey argues that Gekko's most famous saying...
Markets tend to work better than government in helping to solve problems. That's the idea economist Richard Vedder promoted to a group of North Carolina lawmakers during a recent visit to Raleigh. Vedder is a professor at Ohio University, director of the Center for College Affordability and...
Original documents should play an important role in American history education. That's the approach from Roger Beckett, executive director of the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University. Beckett explained his preference for original historical documents over textbooks during a recent presentation...
The "great man" theory of history fell out of favor before Winston Churchill took a leading role on the world stage. It's too bad. That theory seems custom-designed for Churchill, who almost singlehandedly blocked one of the 20th century's greatest evils from triumphing over all of Europe.
Conservatives have spent much time in recent years talking about repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare. Avik Roy, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and opinion editor at Forbes, has a different idea. Roy issued a report in 2014 titled...
"We're in trouble" in the Middle East, according to the retired U.S. Army brigadier general and best-selling military thriller author who also happens to oversee the N.C. Department of Transportation.
It's easy to understand why a group of environmental activists would support new government rules promoting the use of "renewable," "green," or "clean" energy sources. Misguided as the rules might be, they would appear to align government policy more closely to the environmentalists' goals.
If you live in a city with a government-owned convention center, chances are pretty good that it's a money loser. It's also a good bet that government leaders think they can fix the problem by spending more money on the convention center and its surrounding amenities. Heywood Sanders, professor...
Rock 'n' roll is fun; it makes us move, smile, and sing. Dr. Larry Schweikart, professor of history at the University of Dayton, says rock 'n' roll also can change the world. He's the driving force behind the movie Rockin' The Wall. Schweikart discussed the movie's key themes with Mitch Kokai for...
George Gilder doesn't quote the Bard in his latest book, but one could picture him as Hamlet to his reader's Horatio, pointing out: "There are more things in heaven and earth ... than are dreamt of in your philosophy."
As Americans continue to struggle with a sluggish economy, policymakers could learn useful lessons from a president who served in office more than 80 years ago. That's the view of Amity Shlaes, director of the Four Percent Growth Project at the George W. Bush Center, nationally syndicated...
Russia has witnessed massive changes over the past two decades. Not all of them have been good. Yuri Maltsev, professor of economics at Carthage College, served as a top economics adviser to Mikhail Gorbachev, the last leader of the former Soviet Union, before Maltsev defected to the United...
When you drive over uneven pavement or hit a pothole on a North Carolina road, you might wonder whether drivers in other states face better or worse driving conditions. Dr. David Hartgen of The Hartgen Group, emeritus professor of transportation studies at the University of North Carolina at...
Critics often blast entrepreneurs as people who think only about ways to make a buck. That characterization bothers Felix Livingston, professor of economics at Flagler College. During a spring visit to Campbell University, Livingston explained why he's promoting a concept called...
North Carolina lawmakers have devoted much of their time in recent years to expanding parental choice in education. One option they might want to pursue in...
James Madison is often referred to as the "Father of the Constitution." But Madison's ties to the U.S. Constitution go beyond the role he played at its birth. Jeff Broadwater, professor of history at Barton College, highlights...
There's much tradition associated with the office of president of the United States. That wasn't true back in 1791, when the first president, George Washington, was serving his first term. Washington's decision to tour Southern states that year set an interesting precedent for his successors.
The Great Recession offered new ammunition to those attacking the American system of free enterprise, while defenders of that system have spent recent years refining their arguments.
Older     

 
HbAD0
Back to Top